REVIEW: The Sin Eater’s Daughter by Melinda Salisbury

Now, as The Sin Eater’s Daughter begins to emerge into the wild, I feel a burning pride every time I see someone tweet or write about it. The feeling that comes with, ‘MY FRIEND HAS WRITTEN A BOOK!!’ and a book that I have been waiting to read for months and months. Twylla is seventeen years old, betrothed to a prince, and lives in a castle. She’s also an executioner: the moment she touches someone, they die. Twylla is the Goddess Embodied and each month is forced to lay her hands on the treasonous prisoners in the Lormere castle cells. It’s…

REVIEW: The Last Leaves Falling by Sarah Benwell

I feel like The Last Leaves Falling is a friend I’ve watched grow up. I’m so incredibly excited for Sarah and the release of it because I loved it and I know so many of you will too! The Last Leaves Falling tells the story of Sora, a boy with ALS, a neurodegenerative disease that means he is going to die. The novel is so much more than that though – it’s a tale of friendship and discovery, as well as acceptance. Whilst I loved The Last Leaves Falling, I found some scenes very painful for me to read because of…

REVIEW: The Sleeper and the Spindle by Neil Gaimain & Chris Riddell

I read The Sleeper and the Spindle one evening near Christmas and I became totally absorbed. For the half an hour or so I spent reading it, all of me was invested in the characters and plot as the story weaved on. It’s hard to perfectly describe The Sleeper and the Spindle and do it justice at the same time. A darker version of Sleeping Beauty, it’s steeped in mythology and ancient tale. The illustrations by Riddell are beautiful – black and white with gold highlights. The double page spreads were magnificent and I believe the illustrations added a side to the book that wouldn’t be picked…

REVIEW: The Art of Being Normal by Lisa Williamson

The buzz around the release of The Art of Being Normal has been crazy! So many of my trusted friends and fellow reviewers have loved it so the pressure was on when I chose to read it myself. Williamson has created a novel I wish had been written years ago. It’s incredibly brave – I don’t think there’s anything too similar to it published at the moment – and it stands out because of its themes and content. However, I’m sad because I wish there were more books just like The Art of Being Normal. I’m going to make it my…

Me and Mr J by Rachel McIntyre

I was so excited when I received a copy of Me and Mr J to review because I’ve loved the sound of it since it first came to my attention a few months ago. A theme I see a lot in YA is privileged characters that come from a rich background and get whatever they want. I was pleased to read in Me and Mr J that McIntyre has decided to push this trope away and Lara, the protagonist, and her family aren’t in the most ideal financial situation. It was very refreshing to read! The main plot point in Me…

REVIEW: Fashion Assassin by Sarah Sky

I was a HUGE fan of Sky’s debut novel, Code Red Lipstick, and so I was delighted to read the second instalment, Fashion Assassin. In Fashion Assassin, the stakes are even higher as Jessica Cole works to discover Vectra with the setting of Monaco as a backdrop. With bratty models to guard and a deadly mission, Jessica truly is back with even more action. Kickass Protagonist I love Jessica so much! She’s so much fun to read about, and she’s such a refreshing protagonist. Gripping Action Sky’s books are SO awesome. I was gripped for two days and found it incredibly…

REVIEW: Vendetta by Catherine Doyle

You know that feeling when you read an amazing book and you have to re-evaluate everything you once thought about life? Vendetta was that book for me. It completely destroyed me. Vendetta is the version of Romeo and Juliet you wish Shakespeare had written. In one sentence, it’s Shakespeare meets the Mafia – dramatic, spellbinding and phenomenal. I’ve been wanting to read Doyle’s debut novel for what feels like forever, so I had to start it immediately as soon as a copy dropped through my letterbox (after loudly jumping around, screaming, “I HAVE CAT’S BOOK! CAT HAS WRITTEN A BOOK!”). No…

REVIEW: My True Love Gave to Me by Stephanie Perkins

I was incredibly excited when a copy of My True Love Gave to Me popped through my door. Firstly because the cover that greets you is beautiful and secondly due to the amazing authors whose short stories are included. Edited by Stephanie Perkins (author of Anna and the French Kiss), My True Love Gave to Me is a festive-themed anthology, featuring short stories written by authors such as Rainbow Rowell, Laini Taylor and David Levithan. Each story is uniquely tailored to the author’s individual style so whilst they may not be writing in their usual style, their original stamp is still…

REVIEW: Belzhar by Meg Wolitzer

I was reluctant to read Belzhar at first because I’d read very mixed reviews. However, I decided to finally read it on a whim, and I’m very glad I did! Jam Gallahue has been sent to a school far away from her family in the hope to recover from a devastating disaster: her boyfriend dying. The Wooden Barn is a school for people just like her, so when she’s put into a special and exclusive English class called Special Topics, she doesn’t think much of it. It’s only when the class are given a special journal writing assignment that things start…

REVIEW: I Was Here by Gayle Forman

I’ve only ever read one other novel by Forman before – Just One Day – and I really enjoyed that. I didn’t have any expectations going into I Was Here because it sounded a lot grittier than your typical contemporary, so I was very pleasantly surprised. Following the suicide of her best friend, Meg, Cody realises that something is a little bit suspicious. Meg never showed any outward signs that she was unhappy, but Cody feels guilty for not being there for her friend. Starting to investigate, she realises there was a side to Meg that she knew nothing about. Forman…

REVIEW: The Head of the Saint by Socorro Acioli

I was intrigued the minute I read the premise of The Head of the Saint. It was rather vague, but in a good way because it meant that I wanted to read more and more to really consolidate my understanding of what was going on. The women in Samuel’s family can tell when they’re going to die. Given three tasks to complete after his mother’s death, Samuel sets out on a journey to find his father and grandmother, leaving him starved and desperate. He then discovers that he can hear voices, voices of the women who are praying to a doomed…

REVIEW: Code Red Lipstick by Sarah Sky

Distinctive and original, Code Red Lipstick is the outstanding debut novel of a future UKYA star. Sky is the UK equivalent of Ally Carter, with Code Red Lipstick exceeding the Gallagher Girls books in many ways. Jessica Cole’s father is a former spy, having to turn into a private detective after developing MS. When he disappears, MI6 refuse to let Jessica help, so she takes matters into her own hands. On her own in Paris, Jessica’s investigation leads her to find out about Allegra Knight, former supermodel with a lethal side. Her new product, Teenosity, means the start of a nightmare…