REVIEW: Heir of Fire by Sarah J. Maas

        Heir of Fire is an incredible book. The third in the Throne of Glass series by Sarah J. Maas, I couldn’t recommend it highly enough. I’ve put together a review graphic because I cannot put my thoughts into coherent sentences. Basically: It’s AMAZING. Read it now!  

10 DAYS TO GO: 5 Reasons to Read The Maze Runner

With the looming release date of the highly-anticipated movie adaptation of The Maze Runner, here are five reasons you should read the book: One The Maze Runner is action packed and will keep you up reading until the early hours. With a unique premise, it’s easy to slip into the world created by Dashner. Two Reading the book before you watch the film will give you a major advantage over everyone else! Three The world is so original – it even has its own dialect! This book is no pile of klunk.  Four There are so many dystopia novels out there at the moment,…

REVIEW: Trial by Fire by Josephine Angelini

Seeing as though my blog is titled Queen of Contemporary, it may not come as a surprise when I say that I’m not the biggest fan of fantasy. However, that’s not to say that I didn’t like Trial by Fire because, in fact, I loved it. I’ve always had an affinity for fantasy novels that are set in medieval-type villages, towns or cities, and Trial by Fire mixes medieval with magic. It centres on the protagonist Lily who is very ill. After a humiliating event at a party, Lily then finds herself in an alternate Salem to the one she lives…

REVIEW: Don’t Even Think About It by Sarah Mlynowski

What would you do if you could read the minds of the people around you? It sure would be handy when you’ve fallen out with someone and don’t know what you’ve done wrong, or need to tell if someone is lying. Don’t Even Think About It explores this in a fun and gripping way. When Class 10B have their flu injections, things seem normal at first. Then they start to hear the voices. With all of their secrets laid bare, how will this group of students cope as they’re forced to cooperate by something completely out of their hands? Although I’m…

REVIEW: Lobsters by Tom Ellen and Lucy Ivison

I’ve wanted to read Lobsters ever since hearing about it at the start of the year. I absolutely adore contemporaries (hence my blog name!) and so I think I’ve always known how much I would love Lobsters. Hannah and Sam, both in the summer before university, have one thing in common: they have yet to lose their virginity. Their summers are filled with adventure, antics and a quest to find ‘The One.’ If I could describe Lobsters in one word I would label it ‘awkward’ in the best way possible. Teenage life is awkward, which makes it such an amazing portrayal…

REVIEW: Starring Kitty by Keris Stainton

Do you know that feeling when you read a book and you’re a bit numb after reading it because you have no feelings on it at all? I hate that feeling. I hate pouring my time into a book, only for it not to deliver anything at all. Luckily, Starring Kitty made me feel the complete opposite. Starring Kitty is pretty much one of the best books you could ever wish to read, and I don’t ever say that lightly. Instead of writing five pages worth of comments, I’ve decided to do a graphic to explain just how perfect Starring Kitty is. In my head, I have…

REVIEW: Water Born by Rachel Ward

It’s rather fitting that I read Water Born during summer, and an absolutely boiling British one too. Whilst The Drowning, the prelude to Water Born, dealt primarily with a dark side to water, the continuation gets darker still and tackles water and hot weather. Set 17 years after the events of The Drowning, Nic is a passionate swimmer. In the manic clutches of a heat wave, Nicola starts to hear voices underwater, and then the drowning’s start to take place. Just what is happening, and what does it have to do with her dad’s irrational fear of the water? It seems…

REVIEW: Winger by Andrew Smith

I read many books every month and every year and whilst I love the majority of them, sometimes there are a few that really stand out. Winger, by far, is a massive contender for my favourite book of the year. Set in an American boarding school, Ryan Dean Smith is a normal teenage boy who is a winger, hence the title, on the school rugby team and happens to be in love with his best friend, Annie. Winger tells the story of his year in Opportunity Hall, the building that houses the school’s resident troublemakers. Before reading, I was a little…

A Love Letter to Landline

Dear Landline, Landline, Landline, Landline… How much more can I possibly love you? After loving Rainbow Rowell’s previous books so, so much, you were the book I was most excited, but also the most nervous, to read. How could you possibly live up to my extremely high expectations? I don’t know, but you did. You exceeded them by miles (or should I say kilometres?). Landline, you may be about a phone with a mystical connection to the past, but even with the element of magic you managed to hook me in so that you invaded my every thought. Seriously, who needs…

REVIEW: Solitaire by Alice Oseman

What can I say about Solitaire that will convey my thoughts on just how perfect it is? I’ve been eagerly anticipating reading it for months now and so I started it as soon as I opened the parcel containing it. Solitaire tells the story of Victoria Spring, whose hobbies include sleeping, blogging and drinking diet lemonade. Tori is a pessimist and prefers her own company to spending time with others. Things used to be different: she had friends and her brother, Charlie, was okay, but now things are different. When things start happening around the school, harmless pranks which then turn…

REVIEW: Sealed With a Kiss by Rachael Lucas

Sealed with a Kiss, so called because it is set on an island where there are many cute seals, is the perfect summer contemporary to take with you on holiday whilst you’re lying by the pool, or sunbathing in your garden (that’s if Britain ever sees sunshine!). Lucas is a name you definitely need to watch out for in adult contemporary. Hooked from the first page, the novel tells the story of Kate who has just separated from her long-term boyfriend and is looking for a job. When she sees a job for a Girl Friday on a remote island called…

REVIEW: The Year of the Rat by Clare Furniss

The Year of the Rat is a poignant and thought-provoking novel that discusses themes of grief and dealing with the death of a parent and how one goes about leading a normal life after that. After hearing Furniss talk at an event, and hearing part of The Year of the Rat being read, I couldn’t wait to start it. I didn’t know an awful lot about it, but I had an inkling that I would love it, and I really did. Losing somebody close to you must be one of the worst feelings in the world. For Pearl there is the…