7 Reasons to read Keep the Faith by Candy Harper

I read Have a Little Faith last month and craved a sequel so badly so I was mega excited when I received Keep the Faith to review. It saved me from a lot of pain!Keep the Faith carries on where Have a Little Faith left off and, let me tell you, it was even better. Keep the Faith is even funnier than Have a Little Faith, the first book. You may even wet yourself reading it, or cry with tears of laughter. You have been warned (but it’s totally worth it). Faith. Do I need to say anymore? Faith is possibly…

REVIEW: We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

This review is being written five minutes after finishing We Were Liars, so please excuse my thoughts which will probably be all over the place and incoherent. This book is absolutely crazy. I should probably first of all mention that this book was a 3.5 star read for the majority of the book, but I can’t rate it anything but 5 stars after finishing because OMG. It blew me away! Here are some reasons you should read We Were Liars: Family politics mean a really interesting read, and there is a lot of it in the Sinclair family. It’s VERY different…

REVIEW: The Good Luck of Right Now by Matthew Quick

I have very mixed feelings on this novel – parts I loved, other parts I thought were good but they just didn’t enthral me as much as I hoped. Nevertheless, The Good Luck of Right Now is a brilliant novel from the equally brilliant Matthew Quick, author of The Silver Linings Playbook. Bartholomew Neil is middle-aged and has spent the past years looking after his sick mother. The novel starts after her death and we find Bartholomew writing letters to actor Richard Gere after finding a form letter from him in his mother’s underwear drawer. Quick’s novels never fail to make…

REVIEW: The Break-Up Artist by Philip Siegel

The Break-Up Artist immediately attracted me when I heard about it because I don’t think I’ve read a novel with the same concept before, and I wasn’t disappointed. It was original, and lots of fun. The Break-Up Artist, written in first person, is centred on the life of Becca, an American student who, anonymously, gets contracted to break up couples. Becca is a sceptic and knows the damage love can do: her own sister was jilted at the altar and now lives in a constant dejected state. When Becca is asked to break up the school’s power couple, Huxley and Steve,…

Daughters of Time Blog Tour: REVIEW:

Daughters of Time is an anthology written by a group of the most talented UK historical YA writers and it’s a real treat to read. One of the things I love most about anthologies, and Daughters of Time in particular, is that you can dip in and out of it whenever you so choose. For this review, I will be focusing on one of the stories, written about the Greenham Common Women. At the end of each short story, the author talks about their inspiration behind writing it and Leslie Wilson talks about how she was involved with campaigning in the 1980’s. It was…

REVIEW: Red by Alison Cherry

Red was absolutely brilliant, and I haven’t read a book that was so much fun in a long time. Scarletville is a sanctuary where people with red hair flock to. Felicity St John has it all – a popular red-headed boyfriend, brilliant red-headed friends, and she’s set to follow in her mother’s footsteps and win the prestigious Miss Scarlet pageant. The only problem is, Felicity has a secret – she’s not actually redheaded. And in Scarletville, blondes need not apply. Writing this review has brought back the total awesomeness of Red. I’m so, so glad I decided to read it because…

REVIEW: Amy & Matthew by Cammie McGovern

You know a novel is truly flawless when you feel as if it’s natural; the words flow into one and you are witnessing the events through the characters’ eyes without fault. That’s how I felt when reading Amy & Matthew. One of the easiest ways to describe Amy & Matthew is to quote from the text itself: ‘there were many ways to be a freak. Amy had no choice, but other people did. If you worked hard and concentrated, you could hide your freakish thoughts.’ Amy has cerebral palsy, which limits her communication and movement. It’s her senior year and she…

REVIEW: Banished by Liz de Jager

Banished was another of my most highly anticipated books of 2014, and so I was delighted when I won a copy from the publisher. A blend of Maggie Stiefvater’s Lament, with the intensity and passion of Cassandra Clare’s The Mortal Instruments, you really need to watch out for this trilogy. Kit is part of the impressive Blackhart family. Trained to fight, Kit isn’t any normal person, for her family fights enemy Fae. When the prince of Alba, the Fae world, needs rescuing, things turn from bad to worse because Kit has to face a lot more than a rogue Fae. Fae…

REVIEW: Trouble by Non Pratt

Trouble was my most anticipated novel of 2014 and so I was very excited when I was gifted a copy from the lovely Debbie at Snuggling on the Sofa. It feels as if I’ve been waiting for this book my entire YA-reading life. I cannot praise it highly enough. Hannah is 15 and pregnant. Teenage years are hard anyway, so add a bump into the equation, and you have Trouble. The thing is, though, Hannah’s baby is fatherless. So when new boy, Aaron, steps forward for the role and offers to become a stand-in father, it’s unclear if he has ulterior…

REVIEW: The Library of Unrequited Love by Sophie Divry

After it popping up quite a lot and being rather intrigued, I decided to buy The Library of Unrequited Love by Sophie Divry. Being around ninety pages, it’s an incredibly quick read, and I managed to zoom through it one morning. The Library of Unrequited Love tells the story of a French librarian who opens her section of the library one morning to find someone who has been locked in overnight. Written in second person perspective to this person, the narrator discusses her love of books, her problems with the library system, and shares her attraction to one library visitor in…

REVIEW: Leopold Blue by Rosie Rowell

You may know by now that I’ll read practically anything Hot Key Books publish. So when Leopold Blue was offered to me to review, I jumped at the chance. Once again, I wasn’t let down. They really are a miracle publisher. We all know how confusing it can be growing up, and Leopold Blue is a story all about discovery. One of the most striking things about the novel is its beautiful writing and voice. The protagonist, Meg, doesn’t have any friends due to the fact that her mother educates farm workers about AIDS. Set in 1990’s South Africa, the racial…

REVIEW: The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

I don’t usually read classics. I’m not sure why. For some reason, classics are totally different to other books and scare me off. So when I was assigned to read this for school, I was a bit skeptical. After all, it is one of the ‘great American classics.’ The thing is, though, I ended up really, really loving it. It’s now one of my favourite books of all time. To explain the plot is quite hard because there isn’t really a plot at all. The Catcher in the Rye is very character driven, almost entirely character driven. We get hints of…