REVIEW: The Sin Eater’s Daughter by Melinda Salisbury

26 January, 2015

I received this book for free from Scholastic in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

REVIEW: The Sin Eater’s Daughter by Melinda SalisburyThe Sin Eater's Daughter by Melinda Salisbury
Series: The Sin Eater's Daughter #1
Published by Scholastic on 6th February 2015
Genres: fantasy, young adult
Pages: 320
Format: ARC
Source: Scholastic
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five-stars

Seventeen-year-old Twylla lives in the castle. But although she’s engaged to the prince, Twylla isn’t exactly a member of the court.

She’s the executioner.

As the Goddess embodied, Twylla instantly kills anyone she touches. Each month she’s taken to the prison and forced to lay her hands on those accused of treason. No one will ever love a girl with murder in her veins. Even the prince, whose royal blood supposedly makes him immune to Twylla’s fatal touch, avoids her company.

But then a new guard arrives, a boy whose easy smile belies his deadly swordsmanship. And unlike the others, he’s able to look past Twylla’s executioner robes and see the girl, not the Goddess. Yet Twylla’s been promised to the prince, and knows what happens to people who cross the queen.

However, a treasonous secret is the least of Twylla’s problems. The queen has a plan to destroy her enemies, a plan that requires a stomach-churning, unthinkable sacrifice. Will Twylla do what it takes to protect her kingdom? Or will she abandon her duty in favor of a doomed love?

Now, as The Sin Eater’s Daughter begins to emerge into the wild, I feel a burning pride every time I see someone tweet or write about it. The feeling that comes with, ‘MY FRIEND HAS WRITTEN A BOOK!!’ and a book that I have been waiting to read for months and months.

Twylla is seventeen years old, betrothed to a prince, and lives in a castle. She’s also an executioner: the moment she touches someone, they die. Twylla is the Goddess Embodied and each month is forced to lay her hands on the treasonous prisoners in the Lormere castle cells.

It’s not often you read a book, particularly with fantasy, with a character that is very rounded and you get to see every side of them. Salisbury isn’t afraid to show how genuine Twylla is – her emotions are portrayed so realistically that it’s as if you are experiencing them yourself. I loved seeing her vulnerable moments and her character development as the book progressed was enjoyable to read about. I loved her!

Salisbury is informative without being info-dumpy; complex whilst still being understandable; and has so much depth. Something unusual that I was pleased to see was that the plot of The Sin Eater’s Daughter can stand on its own, and whilst we begin to see plot strands leading to the bigger picture of the trilogy, I wasn’t left feeling like all the action would be left until the final book. I loved it and I wish it were something that happens more in trilogies; it makes them so much more exciting!

I loved the theme of faith and religion and how it tied into the mythology within the world. It was brilliant!

I really, really, really can’t wait to read the next book in the trilogy. I’m so invested already in the characters and the world, and the ending left me crying about the yearlong wait. Hurry up please, Mel!

 

BOOK IN A TWEET: READ IT RIGHT NOW.

five-stars

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